Electric off-road vehicles

Offroad VW based vehicles have problems/insights all their own. Not to mention the knowledge gained in VW durability.
Ol'fogasaurus
Posts: 16394
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:17 am

Re: Electric off-road vehicles

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Mon Feb 22, 2021 2:32 pm

chuckput wrote:
Mon Feb 22, 2021 2:00 pm
They have an EV Class at the Pike's Peak Hill climb and they have to haul large, commercial generators up there to insure the EVs are fully charged prior to the start. I still think that for recreational EV vehicles like a buggy, the manufactures will need to develop an interchangeable battery pack similar to what is used in power tools to be usable and successful. You can bring 2 or 3 batteries and charge one while out driving. Yes, the use of a gas or diesel generator to charge your batteries does negate the green aspect of EVs, but there aren't too many options out there. It could be argued that a generator uses less fuel and emits less pollutants than many vehicles running off road currently.
Without pointing fingers... from what I think I am hearing that there is a lot of changes/discoveries (both good and bad) going on over the electric motor thing. For on road cars supposedly the rest stops are supposedly going to have charging stations (will the charging station be required to wear a mask :roll: :lol:) that should recharge the batteries within a fairly short period of time which doesn't do off-roaders much good. Also, will the state and fed off-road sites do this also and how much "gouging" will be done :? :shock: ?

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_vehicle_battery) Some current info on they batteries electric off-road batteries might be using.

(https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=el ... BasicHover) Images of current electric vehicle batteries that we might be using (at least a starting look as I am sure that the batteries will change) which means that our off-road vehicle designs (and weight) will most likely change in several ways.

Getting to be an interesting subject for sure.

Lee

https://www.caranddriver.com/research/a ... tery-life/

Just ran into this.

Lee

ninelives17
Posts: 96
Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2013 1:27 pm

Re: Electric off-road vehicles

Post by ninelives17 » Mon Feb 22, 2021 5:41 pm

https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/jeep ... -charging/

Jeep is installing solar chargers on the Rubicon Trail and Moab.

Ol'fogasaurus
Posts: 16394
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:17 am

Re: Electric off-road vehicles

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Mon Feb 22, 2021 10:28 pm

Had some time today so I went looking for info on transmissions for electric cars. From what I got out of it electric vehicles have only one gear and no clutch. No discussion on reverse so until I learn more I am assuming the the electric motor is run backwards for reverse. It also sounded like the trans, for us'n off-roaders might be a very low gear ratio. Again, no proof other then dialogue in some of the writeups I read.

Maybe it will be bus boxes with almost no innards :shock: :lol: . You still need the big angle CV joints as I don't think one would put an electric motor on each rear wheel.

Lee

User avatar
Leatherneck
Moderator
Posts: 17036
Joined: Sat Jul 01, 2006 8:47 pm

Re: Electric off-road vehicles

Post by Leatherneck » Tue Feb 23, 2021 12:11 pm

Anybody know how much it costs $$ to fill up a typical EV from empty or close to?

User avatar
chuckput
Posts: 377
Joined: Thu Sep 05, 2013 10:01 pm

Re: Electric off-road vehicles

Post by chuckput » Tue Feb 23, 2021 2:06 pm

https://youtu.be/j-WpI-W5vqo

I watched this yesterday. It details EV West in Oceanside, CA that uses recycled Tesla parts to retrofit classic vehicles to electric power trains. One vehicle they feature is a VW Baja Bug which the host only drives around an empty lot. It still does not answer the question as to how you charge your off road EV.

Ol'fogasaurus
Posts: 16394
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:17 am

Re: Electric off-road vehicles

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Tue Feb 23, 2021 2:27 pm

Thanks for this post Chuck; while not a big Mike Brewer fan there a lot of information compacted in this video. Also some of the side video's posted look like there is more VW at al info in them.

I think the open chassis sand rails are going to be interesting to see the changes they will have to go through to get here.

Lee

User avatar
chuckput
Posts: 377
Joined: Thu Sep 05, 2013 10:01 pm

Re: Electric off-road vehicles

Post by chuckput » Tue Feb 23, 2021 8:59 pm

Leatherneck wrote:
Tue Feb 23, 2021 12:11 pm
Anybody know how much it costs $$ to fill up a typical EV from empty or close to?
If you were an early Tesla S buyer, the cost was free. Now you are charged when you hook up to one of their Supercharger stations. Or you can charge it at home.

I found these tidbits:
If electricity costs $0.13 per kWh and the vehicle consumes 33 kWh to travel 100 miles, the cost per mile is about $0.04. If electricity costs $0.13 per kilowatt-hour, charging an EV with a 200-mile range (assuming a fully depleted 66 kWh battery) will cost about $9 to reach a full charge.

According to Solar Reviews, the average cost to fully charge a Tesla Model X is $15.29. The amount is calculated based on a vehicle that uses a 100 kWh battery with an 85% charging efficiency rate.

The average household cost of electricity of $0.13 per kWh is used. Lasting 360 miles on one charge, the cost per mile is approximately $0.042 per mile or $4.24 per 100 miles driven.

Using the same calculations, a Tesla Model 3 with a 50 kWh battery and 263 miles of range will cost $7.65 for a full charge. The cost per mile is approximately $0.03 or $2.91 per 100 miles.

The Tesla Model S Long Range variant runs 412 miles on one charge, costing $15.29. The cost per mile is $0.037 or $3.70 per 100 miles. The cost to charge the battery on the new Tesla Model Y is $11.47. It is equivalent to $0.047 per mile or $4.70 per 100 miles.

User avatar
Leatherneck
Moderator
Posts: 17036
Joined: Sat Jul 01, 2006 8:47 pm

Re: Electric off-road vehicles

Post by Leatherneck » Tue Feb 23, 2021 10:00 pm

That’s not bad at all. For highway cars it’s going to get less expensive in the next couple of years to own one. Not sure about Tesla stock though.

User avatar
chuckput
Posts: 377
Joined: Thu Sep 05, 2013 10:01 pm

Re: Electric off-road vehicles

Post by chuckput » Wed Feb 24, 2021 10:34 am


Ol'fogasaurus
Posts: 16394
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:17 am

Re: Electric off-road vehicles

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Wed Feb 24, 2021 11:26 am

Its going faster (no pun intended) than I thought!

Lee

Jbuggy21
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat Jan 09, 2021 9:41 am

Re: Electric off-road vehicles

Post by Jbuggy21 » Thu Feb 25, 2021 7:59 am

That has been on race-Dezert getting a lot of interest. Mostly positive but that is a rough course and a small operation. Should be interesting to see. They could run a stock full class and just baby it around the course, but I think the most interesting thing will be if they can finish on one charge or have to swap batteries. From what I’ve read it doesn’t sound like anything is getting 250miles while being driven aggressively. All that being said its awesome and I hope that people support it and not discourage. Off-road racing is a small world. We need all the help we can get to keep it alive.

Ol'fogasaurus
Posts: 16394
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:17 am

Re: Electric off-road vehicles

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Thu Feb 25, 2021 12:12 pm

Jbuggy21 wrote:
Thu Feb 25, 2021 7:59 am
That has been on race-Dezert getting a lot of interest. Mostly positive but that is a rough course and a small operation. Should be interesting to see. They could run a stock full class and just baby it around the course, but I think the most interesting thing will be if they can finish on one charge or have to swap batteries. From what I’ve read it doesn’t sound like anything is getting 250miles while being driven aggressively. All that being said its awesome and I hope that people support it and not discourage. Off-road racing is a small world. We need all the help we can get to keep it alive.
Interesting question and for several reasons. If you watched the Steve McQueen movie "Le Mans" at the end of the movie... to make things exiting, one of Steve McQueen's team's car has a broken rear suspension then their competitor has battery problems so each of the vehicles has to have replacements which allows Steve to replace the original driver in the one car so he and the other driver (hot competitors' in a lot races) giving an exciting bumpity-bumpity ending.

To name one other possibility...would having to change batteries near the end so you have a fresh race car be good or bad and or make a close race more exciting?

For us'n sand guys and girls who just ride the sand for fun or to get the &%#$% scared out of you it would be more like can you get back to camp on the charge you are carrying at the time.

It is sounding more and more like electric power has the potential to change things a lot.

Lee

User avatar
chuckput
Posts: 377
Joined: Thu Sep 05, 2013 10:01 pm

Re: Electric off-road vehicles

Post by chuckput » Thu Feb 25, 2021 5:07 pm

The San Felipe race by Lordstown will be interesting to watch. As the article states, they aren't really campaigning the truck. It will only be the platform, or "skateboard" as they call it. So, probably a buggy?

Ol'fogasaurus
Posts: 16394
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:17 am

Re: Electric off-road vehicles

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Thu Feb 25, 2021 7:31 pm

chuckput wrote:
Tue Feb 23, 2021 8:59 pm
Leatherneck wrote:
Tue Feb 23, 2021 12:11 pm
... electricity costs $0.13 per kWh and the vehicle consumes 33 kWh to travel 100 miles, the cost per mile is about $0.04. If electricity costs $0.13 per kilowatt-hour, charging an EV with a 200-mile range (assuming a fully depleted 66 kWh battery) will cost about $9 to reach a full charge.

According to Solar Reviews, the average cost to fully charge a Tesla Model X is $15.29. The amount is calculated based on a vehicle that uses a 100 kWh battery with an 85% charging efficiency rate.

The average household cost of electricity of $0.13 per kWh is used. Lasting 360 miles on one charge, the cost per mile is approximately $0.042 per mile or $4.24 per 100 miles driven.

Using the same calculations, a Tesla Model 3 with a 50 kWh battery and 263 miles of range will cost $7.65 for a full charge. The cost per mile is approximately $0.03 or $2.91 per 100 miles.

The Tesla Model S Long Range variant runs 412 miles on one charge, costing $15.29. The cost per mile is $0.037 or $3.70 per 100 miles. The cost to charge the battery on the new Tesla Model Y is $11.47. It is equivalent to $0.047 per mile or $4.70 per 100 miles.
Gad... electrical charging (aka gas taxes) taxes are going to go nuts over this. A nickel for mile charge for electricity and a couple of dollars of taxes per mile charge (a different type of charge though) :shock: :? :evil: :wink: :lol: .

Lee

Post Reply