Just bought a Everlast 140E (review)

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theKbStockpiler
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Just bought a Everlast 140E (review)

Post by theKbStockpiler » Wed Jul 29, 2020 9:39 pm

Originally I had a 105 amp Century 155GS. That's right. The name has '155' in it but it's max amps is 105. :lol: It was holding me back so I got a 252 Fabricator to supplement it. It's a awesome welder but it's overkill for most of the stuff I do and takes more effort to set up, 220 volt cord etcetera. With the belief that a more modern 120V welder would increase my production I purchased a Everlast 140E. The Fabricator was the first Inverter MIG I Had ever used ;and as I have stated before, it makes a all transformer welder seem like it's broken, The arc is more stable , it starts the arc faster ,the arc is clearer etcetera. The Fabricator is marketed as having (Power Factor Correction) while the 140E does not but the 140E is also much superior to my Century welder.

The 140E is touted as having a 135 max output. And how do they do this with a 120V welder you may ask? It needs a 30amp High Magnetic breaker. I knew this before hand and it's also somewhat misleading. Most household outlets only go up to 20 amps so you will need special wiring anyways. The wire drive assembly looks good and sturdy but the rest of the welder is not really robustly built. Neither is my Fabricator for that mater and it cost 3 times as much when I bought it. The build quality is okay and should be good enough for home use. The front panel only fits one side correctly and the other overlaps the case. Why they didn't design the front cover right is beyond me. The minimal wire speed is 80imp and not the 60 the sales brochure states.I wanted a slow wire speed capacity because it works better with flux core. I contacted the sales people there about this and ,well they did not know what they were talking about but it seems to be slow enough for my use. I modified my century to do 40ipm but the inverter design works better at faster wire speeds. Everlasts use a Euro Connect MIG gun which is easy to replace and use. I wish all welders used this type of gun. The Everlast gun is on the cheap side and it only ships with a very short ground cable, like 4 feet. :lol: I purchased a longer one for it.I have bought replacement 'Welder Direct' Guns and they are a little better than the supplied Everlast but are still on the cheap side. I have had good service from them so far. The Everlast ships with the cheap floating ball regulator but I have never had a problem with them. As far as the beads possible to lay down ,the 140E is much like the Fabricator and will hold a stable arc at lower voltages than a all transformer welder so this allows you to be able to arc at a lower setting where a transformer welder won't arc at all. The wire roll holder works good with the 4" inch rolls and does not need a adapter which is a big plus. The 140E's wire speed is also much more consistent than my Century. The 140E's fan is not really loud so that is nice as well. It continuously runs. I only like the simple 'E' series of Everlast MIGs. Their upper range models don't have options that they really should have like adjustable pre and post settings on the shielding gas.Harbor Freights Valcan brand flux core mig nozzles fit Everlast by the way.

So initially anyways, it looks like I will be getting more work done as desired.
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Dale M.
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Re: Just bought a Everlast 140E (review)

Post by Dale M. » Tue Aug 04, 2020 8:02 am

The AC power thing with 120 V. AC MIG welder is not uncommon... I have Hobart Handler 140 and on top setting it would also trip 20 AMP breaker. The numbers in the spec sheets are a bit misleading as the are averaged to "mid range" power draw.... Doing the math and going by the KVA draw listed in spec sheet it can actually draw up to 24.9 amps at 120 V. AC .... So a 30 amp "dedicated welder circuit " is required....

Dale
"Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson
1970 "Kellison Sand Piper Roadster"

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theKbStockpiler
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I did some flux core welding today.

Post by theKbStockpiler » Thu Sep 24, 2020 8:03 pm

I did some fluxcore welding today with the 140E and discovered that the wire speed has different requirements than my two other MIGs. With my all Transformer MIG, I set the voltage for the thickness of the material and run a wire speed that is a little faster than melting off in globs. With the 140E it's the other way around. If you don't have the wire speed somewhere close to where it will stub into the work ,it creates gas pockets. Maybe I got some bad wire? :? With my all transformer welder, if you use too high of a voltage the weld bead gets very porous and this is a known issues with other welders as well.

Something else is that at full power ,the 140E is not tripping a 20amp breaker when it's supposed to have a HighMagnetic 30amp. :? I'll bet the capacity rating on this welder is exaggerated. It will burn through 1/16" steel so you don't have to gap or bevel it.
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Jadewombat
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Re: Just bought a Everlast 140E (review)

Post by Jadewombat » Fri Sep 25, 2020 10:27 pm

Need pictures. Check the polarity of the leads. Most MIG welders you have to switch polarity between solid core and Flux welding.

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theKbStockpiler
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Re: Just bought a Everlast 140E (review)

Post by theKbStockpiler » Sat Sep 26, 2020 7:44 pm

I can get a perfect bead ,but the wire speed has to be faster than the minimal that is necessary to avoid melting off in globs.
If you are welding thick stock and want to get as much penetration as possible on one pass, you can't necessarily max out your welder. I had a similar issue with my all transformer Century. If I exceeded the voltage settings in the manual or the sticker under the cover with fluxcore, it would get porousy. I asked two other welders what could be causing this and they both said to look at the chart. From memory, I don't remember my bigger inverter welder doing this.

I think I read that the weld puddle gets too agitated with too high a voltage. I'm assuming that the higher wire speed counteracts this some how.

If I get time I'll do a test piece at the same voltage but different wire speeds and post pictures.
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Dale M.
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Re: Just bought a Everlast 140E (review)

Post by Dale M. » Mon Oct 19, 2020 9:23 am

Wire speed in chart are only ball park figures, dial it up or down to get the correct bead/penetration...

I found this video to be great help to analyze problems...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xod-ByrxHg4

Dale
"Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson
1970 "Kellison Sand Piper Roadster"

Ol'fogasaurus
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Re: Just bought a Everlast 140E (review)

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Mon Oct 19, 2020 11:50 am

Dale M. wrote:
Mon Oct 19, 2020 9:23 am
Wire speed in chart are only ball park figures, dial it up or down to get the correct bead/penetration...

I found this video to be great help to analyze problems...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xod-ByrxHg4

Dale
I didn't see the video but Dale is correct; what you are welding may not be exactly the same quality as it's meeting piece and that can be true even if it is off the same piece of material. Unless you are sure of the quality the material (specifications that the material is made to) is made to you may have to adjust the wire, power, gas(?) and your technique. The spec for the material is supposedly what the material is built to and there are many specs around the world.

Lee

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theKbStockpiler
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Re: Just bought a Everlast 140E (review)

Post by theKbStockpiler » Tue Oct 20, 2020 11:16 pm

Thanks for the replies!
I thought that the charts on the inside of the welder were just a rough estimate but the one on my Century proved to be very accurate, Once I actually turned down the voltage to get it back on the chart the porosity issue went away immediately. I have sort of a rhetorical question. Why is it that you can actually weld with a higher voltage than is on the chart but they don't recommend it and you won't burn through? Shouldn't maximum penetration in one pass be better? According to a professional multi process welder I asked, it's porosity and over heating the flux caused this.

I watched the video to make sure it was for beginners.
The green welder he is using looks to be a Everlast Pulse Mig. The Pulse feature is not being used but it's looks to be Everlasts highest end model. None of my wire feed welders have characteristics like that one. Both of my inverters have a vast wire speed range that they will work in. I did not believe welders could be so different until I had more experience with different models. My transformer welder is very simple but my inverters are so different you sort of have to learn to weld all over again.

Does anyone know why he's changing speed with the bead? He keeps slowing down and then speeding up to first have the electrode in the first 1/3 of the pool to slowing way down to actually holding the pool back. It's not part of the presentation. It's as if he wants the bead to look like a series of tack welds.
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66brm
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Re: Just bought a Everlast 140E (review)

Post by 66brm » Sat Oct 24, 2020 7:08 pm

To ensure the heat gets into the parent metal and makes a good solid bond by melting it as part of the weld. If you don't then the weld ends up sitting on top of the steel as a line of filler wire rather than a weld with good bonding strength

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theKbStockpiler
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Re: Just bought a Everlast 140E (review)

Post by theKbStockpiler » Sun Oct 25, 2020 8:24 pm

Thanks for the reply!

Is there a name for the technique to research it more?
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66brm
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Re: Just bought a Everlast 140E (review)

Post by 66brm » Mon Oct 26, 2020 5:52 am

I don't know if it has a name, but it was something I was taught while at trade school when learning to weld some twenty years ago. We would weld two pieces of plate steel together and then try break them apart. A good weld would deform the steel before breaking, poor welds would let go with little force in the hydraulic press

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theKbStockpiler
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Re: Just bought a Everlast 140E (review)

Post by theKbStockpiler » Mon Oct 26, 2020 10:44 pm

It mostly resembles a Straight Stepped weave. I believe that part of the purpose of a weave is to add additional heat to the area. Sort of like Preheating. Arc force and the creater created must be reduced if welding right over the bead again I would think. :?
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