uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

General tips/tricks/tools that could be utilized on any platform.
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theKbStockpiler
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uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

Post by theKbStockpiler » Wed Nov 20, 2019 8:13 pm

I'm currently trying get the capacity of a metal lathe and I'm wondering if there are any other things that can be done with one that I have not thought of. Here's a list in the order of stuff that I wanted one for in chronological order.

-Cut drivers for pressing bearings
-Making adapters for pressing in balljoints that align the press with the bore and not push it with a lot of side load.
-Making bushings and sleeves for repairs.
-Cutting down crank bearings
-Making bolts although I have learned that store bought bolts are rolled and are stronger.
-Cutting ACME threads for making a special tool or something that works like a puller or a press.
-Making custom or extra long punches/drifts.


These tasks can be done with minimal tooling.
I would love to be able to cut gears but that's a job for a mill and a divider.

Did I not think of a good repair that a lathe would come in handy for? :?
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Ol'fogasaurus
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Re: uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Wed Nov 20, 2019 8:47 pm

Wasting metal :lol:

Actually having a lathe and/or a milling machining (or like I have a combination rig) you can do a lot of detailed or "make to fit" changes to things. It opens up a whole new world of things one can do. I forget who it is on STF right now but he is going wild with neat stuff he is now available to do.

Custom making a custom hole for threading in tube (https://www.metalsupermarkets.com/diffe ... less-tube/) you will most likely end up doing some where along the way.

Punches and drifts I am not sure about as they usually, but not always, are forged and heat treated. The use of drift pins is a very simple/easy thing to do but for some reason it has become a lost art.

Just be aware that they are not cheap so get the right thing the first time and make it so you can do what you want. Be careful of used machines as they can be either good or "why are you really selling it or what are you hiding from me".

Lee

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theKbStockpiler
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Re: uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

Post by theKbStockpiler » Wed Nov 20, 2019 9:05 pm

I was thinking that chromemolly would be okay for a drift/punch. I'm now planning on trying to get the lathe I stated that I did not want, a southbend 9". :oops: Seeing as a lathe has to be cleaned and oiled a lot , I do not want a non module design like the Asian models. The Asian models are going to obsolete themselves pretty fast so I think this offsets having to get used parts for a southbend. The smaller Asian models have very small tailstocks, steady rests, etcetera which makes me doubt that they can do a decent job on steel. Also I wanted a lathe that could be torn down for easy transport or moving to a basement. That's how the decision making is working out anyways. The southbends or the commercial atlas lathes seem the way to go in my opinion.
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Re: uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Wed Nov 20, 2019 9:54 pm

theKbStockpiler wrote:
Wed Nov 20, 2019 9:05 pm
I was thinking that chromemolly would be okay for a drift/punch. I'm now planning on trying to get the lathe I stated that I did not want, a southbend 9". :oops: Seeing as a lathe has to be cleaned and oiled a lot , I do not want a non module design like the Asian models. The Asian models are going to obsolete themselves pretty fast so I think this off setted having to get used parts for a southbend. The smaller Asian models have very small tailstocks, steady rests, etcetera which makes me doubt that they can do a decent job on steel. Also I wanted a lathe that could be torn down for easy transport or moving to a basement. That's how the decision making is working out anyways. The southbends or the commercial atlas lathes seem the way to go in my opinion.
Strong metal turning machines can weigh a lot and that is a problem if you are in a having to move occasionally or move the lathe around situation. Too light weight then you could have problems over a long period of time. The stand for them has to be strong and not torque on you as things can get out of whack easily. Can't truthfully answer the off-shore situation other than materials used can be the difference between yes and no but then there are locally made stuff that isn't any better. If you haven't done it look at things unbias-ly (insult not intended). Read the ratings by users starting at the low rating and moving up. One of the things I do when looking at things.

The "punch" material I might agree with but the drift pin can be of a different material unless you are using it for more than temporary "locating" or "holding in place" situations. Most of the drift pins I use I am careful but, I have used them incorrectly too :oops: and ruined them.

When I got my combination lathe and milling machine I got it with the capability of turning large object such as machining front brake drums to turn them in to hubs for sand tires and rims to fit on. I haven't done as many as I thought but I have done it.

Lee

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Re: uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

Post by Bad Bob » Thu Nov 21, 2019 1:55 am

The jobs you can find for a lathe (and mill) are limitless. Keep an eye on prices in your area to get a feel for what machines sell for. Prices vary widely depending the area. If you buy something that you find later to be “not enough”, you can always sell it. Get the biggest lathe that you have room for, and can supply power to. We used to have a 13” Taiwanese made Jet in the VW shop I worked at. Not too bad. My first lathe was a 14” Logan that had a fair amount of wear, but served well for 20+ years.

If you’re looking for steel to make punches or other tools, pretty much any steel can be used with some heat treating. A cheap source of 4140 is hydraulic cylinder shafts. Sometimes free! Axles, torsion bars, springs, etc.

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theKbStockpiler
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Re: uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

Post by theKbStockpiler » Thu Nov 21, 2019 9:22 am

Thanks for the ideas BB! I want a lathe that has from 23-29 between the centers which puts a newer modern lathe out of the budget. A SB will be easier to parts out and or will not depreciate as fast as a Asian one in my opinion too. I like logans and jets but in my locale I'm in sort of a 'dead zone' for used products. I would prefer a 4' bed southbend but I think the 3 1/2 bed ones are more common so I will most likely get the smaller one. I just bought the parts to turn a C lathe into a A lathe off of Ebay because there are hardly any A Southbends in my loacale. The C's don't have a power crossfeed which is sort of ridiculous. :shock:

I scored a pair of f250 axles the other day. Some day I may get motivated to go to the metal salvage yard and pick through their pile of stuff sold/bought by the pound.

Another automotive related job for a lathe that I though of was turning communicators on motors or whatever. Edit: Custom door hinge pins and specifically door hinge bushings would be a great way to raise a sagging door. Maybe English wheel anvils could be made as well.
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SCOTTRODS
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Re: uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

Post by SCOTTRODS » Thu Nov 21, 2019 8:05 pm

You mentioned E-Wheel anvils... how about some Bead roller dies as well... I used to have the shop make Bushing and bearing removal and installation tools for me in Aviation... they often had to be very specific to avoid damage to the landing gear castings I worked on, and some other items as well... Sometimes the removal tools were quite different than the install tools as well. It's nice to have a lathe handy to polish up chrome pistons for shocks as well... providing you ever get to open up things like that and rebuild... hydraulic rams etc, are the same kind of job... nothing works better than some scotchbrite for cleaning up the chrome while turning at a good speed.
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Re: uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

Post by Bad Bob » Fri Nov 22, 2019 9:55 pm

Image
All my anvils and bead roller dies were made on my lathe. Lots of other tooling too.
Oversized main thrust bearings get cut to fit the case. Trim your cylinders to length to get the deck right where you want it. Trim piston tops too. I’ve even made butterflies for throttle bodies.
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theKbStockpiler
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Re: uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

Post by theKbStockpiler » Fri Nov 22, 2019 11:10 pm

I'm curious as to how a piston or cylinder is attached to a lathe. Is a 4way chuck used? :?
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Bad Bob
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Re: uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

Post by Bad Bob » Fri Nov 22, 2019 11:22 pm

I use a 3-jaw and make an aluminum plug on the outboard end held in by a live center.

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Re: uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

Post by Bad Bob » Sat Nov 23, 2019 9:10 pm

Here’s the setup I use.
3245372C-80D1-4C3A-BEC5-AC492CEF8663.jpeg
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theKbStockpiler
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Re: uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

Post by theKbStockpiler » Sat Nov 23, 2019 9:12 pm

Is the plug tapered and pressed into the cylinder as a interference fit? Does the piston just go directly into the chuck. I guess cylinder spacers could also be make with a regular lathe as well. :D
Thanks for the pic. We posted at almost the exact same time.
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Bad Bob
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Re: uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

Post by Bad Bob » Sun Nov 24, 2019 12:02 am

The plug is tapered and keeps the cylinder from slipping off the chuck jaws. If you use a 3-jaw chuck, be careful to avoid using too much pressure and distorting the cylinder. And yes, I’ve made spacers also.

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SCOTTRODS
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Re: uses for a metal lathe with car repair/modification.

Post by SCOTTRODS » Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:53 am

Pretty cool stuff right there... Love the Jug set up. Looks like a great adaptation...
I have found them completely missing more than once. - PILEDRIVER

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